Sensa Weight Loss System

Posted by 27 February, 2009 As diet,diet forum,diet pills,diet supplements,magic diet,magic pill,weight loss forum (1) Comment

Browsing the internet, I come across crazy diets all the time. All of them promise fast and easy weight loss. Often without diet (eat all the food you want!) and without exercise. Magic!

Obviously there is a market for these diets. Otherwise they wouldn’t exist. So are we so gullible? Do we so easily believe these unrealistic promises? That this diet will do what others failed to do?

Do we believe that the weight loss claims are real? That the success stories exist? And that the persons depicted actually used the magic supplement they are selling?

It seems that many do. And are willing to pay a lot of money for another quick fix. If Acai didn’t do it, Wu-Yi didn’t do it, perhaps this Sensa will?

So what is Sensa?

It is a powder (!) that you sprinkle (!) on your food and it makes you eat less.

Backed by “25 years of study” and “clinical study.”

The 25 years research consisted of testing out “sprinkles” or Sensa Tastants (patent pending!). The ingredients in the Tastants are of course not fully disclosed more than that they contain Maltodextrin (corn starch, used as a bulking agent, no doubt), Tricalcium Phosphate (bone ash), Silica (sand), Natural and Artificial Flavors (proprietary), FD&C Yellow 5 (synthetic yellow dye), and Carmine (red pigment from scale insects). Sensa also contains Soy and Milk ingredients.

Hmm. Perhaps you really would eat less if you sprinkled this on food.

The clinical study consisted of one study where 1,436 people sprinkled Tastants on their food for 6 months and then were compared to 100 people that did not. The Tastant group lost 30 pounds while the control group lost only 2! Wow! And it must be true as the study is published. Actually, only the abstract (summary) is published. In “Advanced Technologies and Treatments for Diabetes”, First International Conference, Prague, Czech Republic, February 27, 2008.

Searching, I actually found the abstract. No study. This is the entire text:

USE OF GUSTATORY STIMULI TO FACILITATE WEIGHT LOSS

A .R. Hirsch
Smell & Taste Treatment And Research Foundation, Chicago, IL, USA

Background: Excess weight is a risk factor for myriad illnesses including diabetes. Despite its ubiquity, treatment is, for the most part, ineffective focusing on conscious, draconian self-deprivation efforts including portion control, fasting, hedonic sacrifice, or initiation of a rigorous, often painful, exercise program. Chemosensory modification to induce weight loss has used both aversive and nonaversive olfactory and hedonically positive gustatory stimuli.

Hypothesis: Noncaloric tastant crystals added to food enhance gustatory evoked satiety, reducing consumption, as manifest by weight loss.

Methods: Two thousand four hundred thirty-seven overweight or obese subjects, over a six-month period, sprinkled a variety of savory or sweet tastant crystals onto their food prior to mandiculation. Pre and post study weights were obtained and compared to one hundred nontreated controls.

Results: One thousand four hundred and thirty-six patients (87.4% female, 12.6% male) with an average initial weight of 208 pounds, and BMI of 34.2, completed this study. The average weight loss was 30.5 pounds, 5.0 BMI, versus control of 2 pounds, 0.3 BMI (p<0.05).

Conclusion: Use of tastants to enhance or generalize sensory specific satiety demonstrated efficacy in the promotion of weight loss. Further investigation into this approach on the secondary effects of obesity and diabetes is warranted.

If this “study” is so convincing, why not make it available on the web site that sell the “sprinkles?” Not holding up for peer review?

So, now, when you have read my glowing review, are you ready to shell out $59 (special price!) for a one month’s supply of sprinkles? With autoship! Or, if you were really impressed by the “study” and the “success stories” you can go directly to the 6 months option, for $235, with autoship!


Comments
Posted by H. Gersh July 6, 2009

Nice sleuthing and explanation. A major limitation is the use of completers only for this analysis. This Completers only approach would be OK if the dropouts (41%) was truly random. However, one should be skeptical of these claims and usually these studies use something called Last Observation Carried Forward, reflecting that dropouts last weight at dropout carried forward. This strategy reflects the reality that most dropouts didn’t get any benefit and presents more conservative claims. Nonetheless, for most diet products (even placebos), there’s enough reality to go around that some people benefit.

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